Grass With Roots And Soil

Harrowing in Agriculture: The Key Functions of Harrows

Grass With Roots And SoilHarrowing is one of the most important soil preparation methods in the agricultural industry. It serves many different functions, from the breaking up to the levelling of heavy soil; removal of dead grass to rooted weeds; to preparing the seedbed to promoting better root aeration.

These aforementioned processes are just some of the many other ways farmers in Australia use harrow. For this reason, it is important for farm owners and operators to consider investing in such equipment.

Harrowing in agriculture

At its core, the process of harrowing involves breaking up and smoothening out ploughed field surfaces using the implement known as “harrow.” Through harrowing, farmers can break up lumps of soil faster and more easily, which gives the soil a finer finish.

The improved texture makes the soil more suitable for use as a seedbed. However, it is also possible for a coarser harrowing, which allows for the removal of weeds and covering seed after sowing.

Choosing the harrow type

Harrows come in several different forms, each of which has specific purposes and applications. As such, it is important for operators to have adequate knowledge of their uses, as this can affect the resulting texture and fineness of the soil.

Amongst the most common types of harrowing implements include disc harrows, chain harrows, chain disc harrows, and tine harrows.

Today, most of these essential pieces of agricultural equipment come tractor-mounted, although, in traditional times, the process required the use of draft animals, including horses and mule, to draw them.

Just as critical as choosing the correct type of harrow is timing. It is of utmost importance that farmers carry out harrowing activities at the right time, such as during dry and warm weather. The key reason behind this is to let the harrowed droppings dry out, which then results in the elimination of parasites.

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